Schools of Waller County http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/ Schools of Waller County Brookshire School 1914 According to history, the first school was built in 1895 at a cost of $45. The school pictured was built in 1914 in Brookshire at the location of the Royal Elementary School as of 1968. The brick building was sometimes called Brookshire?s second school. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=195788658 195788658 Brookshire School 1950 http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=135600590 135600590 Brookshire Elementary http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=195788657 195788657 Royal High School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=134778310 134778310 Royal High School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=134778311 134778311 Brookshire School Demolition Area http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=135600626 135600626 Hempstead Elementary School 1936 Was originally the Hempstead High School located on Hwy 159. In the 1930?s, Cedar Creek, Howth, Louisville, and Lane View were consolidated into the Hempstead District. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=135600905 135600905 Waller County High School 1936-37 http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=142252752 142252752 AUROA SCHOOL Auroa was located about five miles south of Monaville and near Sunnyside in the 1920's or 1930's. In the 1890's, the Monaville school district included Brady Island, Monaville and Aurora. The school was located on the NW corner of Buller Road and White's Chapel Road. This is just south of FM-529 and just west of FM-359. Like several of Waller County's early schools, Aurora was used as a dance hall as well as for other community functions. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402312 149402312 Early Pattison School and Aurora School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=147013710 147013710 Brookshire School 1914 http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=135600910 135600910 Fetzer School Fetzer was a railroad town named for an employee of the International and Great Northern RR in northeast Waller County. Located on Riley Road near FM-1774. Fetzer is only remembered today for Henry?s Hideaway, a popular dance hall at in the 1940?s and 1950?s. Patrons (who were or had been drinking) were warned against using the back door - the building backed to a ?dry? county! The Fetzer School was similar in construction and appearance to the Ogg School, a one room building with rough vertical clapboard siding - there was a sawmill at Fetzer. These are typical of the early one-room schools. High ceilings aided ventilation. Later, one or two-room buildings with horizontal lap siding and three windows to a side became a ?standard.? Bess Creek, Cedar Creek, and Highland Home are representative of this new ?standard? construction. Mrs. Minnie Jenkins taught here for 4 months in 1919. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=135601098 135601098 Brookshire School Demolishtion 1947 http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=135601119 135601119 Brookshire Colored High School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=135601131 135601131 Best Creek School after year 2000 Still located west of Bessies Creek and on the south side of Boseman Road, the old building has been moved and is stored on private property. The Bess Creek School opened in 1894 consolidated with the Pattison School in 1930. It was also known as the ?Dixon School.? http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=135601364 135601364 Bess Creek School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=155892241 155892241 Pattison Old School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=135601375 135601375 Cedar Creek School edar Creek School opened in 1894, just off Highway 6 near FM-2979. This is a newer school on that site. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=135601379 135601379 Hempstead High School 1895 http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=135601115 135601115 Auroa School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402313 149402313 Bob Burton School There were two schools on Mt. Zion Road, in the 1920?s. The older was Mt. Zion School, located about 50 yards west of Hall Road on the north side of Mt. Zion Road. A new school was built in in 1925, on the south side of Mt. Zion between the Sunnyside cemetery and Lewis Lane. It was named Bob Burton, since he donated the land. This was a Rosenwald funded school for black children. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402314 149402314 Brookshire Royal High School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402315 149402315 Brookshire School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402317 149402317 Cedar Creek School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402318 149402318 MODERN CLASSROOM The school is unknown - probably Hempstead or Brookshire. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402319 149402319 FIELDS STORE SCHOOL Field?s Store Community developed after the Civil War, on FM-1488 northeast of Prairie View. There was a church here and likely a school as early as 1845, but was not known as Field?s Store until after D. H. Field purchased land here in 1866. A road once ran west to the Rock Island Ferry, an important crossing at the Brazos River A Post Office was recorded in 1874. A population of 150 supported three stores, a cotton gin, school, Masonic Lodge, and a Woodmen of the World Lodge during the 1890?s and early 1900?s. The old hanging tree was still nearby, in the middle of a road in the 1940?s. Field?s Store was near one of the last big timber sawmill areas, some old timers relate seeing pine stumps 4 to 5 ft. in diameter from the last stand of virgin forest. Others say, ?they were not that large, but they were big.? Field?s Store School was first located near the home of Shaw, then moved to its last location near New Hope Cemetery. School enrollment included 64 students and 3 teachers in 1924. The higher grades began attending Waller in the 1930?s or 1940?s and finally the Fields Store School consolidated with the Waller School in 1953. The pictured building burned in April 2001. Black children attended the Lawrence Key School from 1891 to 1921. Key on FM-1736 consolidated with Laneview School on Laneview Road and later consolidated with Hempstead?s Sam Swartz School in 1934. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402321 149402321 Fields Store School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=135600900 135600900 Field Store School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402322 149402322 HEMPSTEAD COLORED HIGH SCHOOL circa 1900 School was located on the site of the current Swartz School. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402962 149402962 Hempstead Band Hall Vocational Agriculture teacher, James E. Miers is pictured with two fellows who appear to be doing landscaping. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402963 149402963 Hempstead City White School (Groce School) Once located on the south side of St. Barbe Street, between 11th and 13th Streets, the school faced north, looking down the center of 12th Street. This is the site of the present Hempstead Elementary School Complex. The school grounds extended south to Peebles Street, blocking Groce and Kasse Streets. The area covered six city blocks and the joining streets - a Hempstead city block is 1.55 acres. The building is drawn to scale on a Hempstead 1925 fire & water facilities map. This photo was also on a post card. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402977 149402977 Hempstead High School Also known as the Groce School. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402964 149402964 Hempstead High School 1930 http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402965 149402965 First Hempstead High School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402966 149402966 Highland Home School Highland Home was the last one-room school in Waller County. Grades one through seven were taught. Earlier the Boyd School had been across the road on Boyd property, sometime between 1890 and 1893. Highland Home appears on an 1894 school district list and was consolidated with Waller in 1929. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402967 149402967 Highland School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402968 149402968 Mt ZION SCHOOL (Brookshire) The school opened in the 1890?s and served the Mt. Zion Community near Leslie Station in Brookshire or Pattison. Leslie Station was the railroad depot and there was a Leslie Cotton Gin in 1893. This school was not the Mt. Zion Church or school at Sunnyside. Sunnyside Another Mt. Zion School opened in the 1870?s on Mt. Zion Road at Sunnyside. This was on 5/7 acre just west of Irons Creek in S. William?s Grant, purchased in 1890 from T. W. House et al. as part of a tract known as the Weston Place. (Robert A. Weston) And was replaced by the Bob Burton school. These two schools were on Mt. Zion Road, the older was about 50 yards west of Hall Road on the north side of Mt. Zion. The newer in 1925 was called Bob Burton School since he donated the land on the south side of Mt. Zion. The new school was between the Sunnyside cemetery and Lewis Lane. Rosenwald built the Bob Burton school. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402969 149402969 Ogg School John Ogg built a small one room school at his home on Walnut Creek near Joseph Road shortly after the Civil war. About 1880, T. S. Dinkins donated land on Macedonia Road, north of ?Three-Mile Creek, for a school. The new Ogg School was a one room, vertical clapboard building, resembling a smokehouse from the front. It was never painted and had no interior ceiling. The Ogg School had eight grades and Oren Etheridge was one of the teachers. In the 1920?s, Ogg consolidated with McPherson School to form the two-teacher Macedonia School. Herbert Gosler and his foster mother, Mrs. J. O. Dinkins donated land for the school. The Macedonia School consolidated with Waller in 1942. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402970 149402970 Pine Island School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402971 149402971 Pine Island School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402972 149402972 PRAIRIE VIEW STATE COLLEGE 1876 - 1936 Alta Vista was Jared E. Kirby?s plantation home. At the end of the Civil war in May 1865, with the Texas armies (about 20,000 men) camped all around Hempstead, the three commanding generals stayed at Alta Vista. After Generals Lee and Johnson surrendered in the east and Jefferson was captured - Alta Vista was the last major command post of the Confederacy. Davis was captured while attempting to reach Hempstead, where the last stand would be made in order to negotiate the best possible terms of capitulation. How ironic, that the last major command of the Confederacy became a black university. Had all this been known, this historic building would certainly have been preserved. At after Kirby?s death in 1865, Mrs. Kirby opened Alta Vista Institute as a boarding school for girls in her home. In 1876 she sold her home to the state to become Prairie View State College - it would become Prairie View A&M University. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402973 149402973 South Texas Baptist College http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402975 149402975 Waller School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=149402976 149402976 Hempstead School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=150373011 150373011 Hempstead School Ventilation was an obvious design concern, as the huge cupola or tower dominates the architecture. The photo appears on a post card. In courthouses and public buildings of the era, the tower housed the bell or clock and it?s function as a ?convection current? draft vent is hardly noticed. The tower was above stairways or halls to vent air sucked in through open windows. The brick ?gym-like? building is detached as is the small frame building in the rear. The rest rooms were one-story frame additions on either side of the back of the main building in 1924 - and they had running water and electric lights. The school was located on the site of the present elementary school campus, the front of the building faced north, looking up 12th Street. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=150373012 150373012 Sam Schwarz School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=150373013 150373013 Hempstead School about 1950 http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=155901360 155901360 Sam Swartz School 1928 The Sam Swartz Training School in Hempstead opened in the fall of 1928 after the two-story frame school burned. Mrs. Ida Swartz donated the land, on Austin Street, in memory of her father, Sam. This was a Rosenwald funded school and R. M. Pearson was the first principal. This new land was added to the site of the old school - about eight blocks east of the Hempstead railroad depot. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=155902178 155902178 Hempstead Colored School The two-story frame building was erected in 1905 and W. L. Davis was the principal from 1906 to 1915. The second story housed a chapel used for morning devotion. Classes were held downstairs. A library was added in 1908 and vocational agriculture was added in 1916. The photo probably shows the agriculture class and their project. The school burned in 1927 and the students attended school in the Baptist and Methodist Churches for the school year until the Sam Swartz school opened in the fall of 1928. The school was located about eight blocks east of the Hempstead railroad depot. The ?Hempstead Texas? Postmark in the lower left corner implies this was a post card. A photo of the Groce School in Hempstead was also made into a post card. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=155902580 155902580 Kickapoo School The Kickapoo Indians were a large ?war like? and well known Great Lakes tribe, which migrated to Texas in 1819. Welcomed by the Mexican Government, they made war upon Apaches and Commanches who constantly raided the Mexicans. Austin?s map of Texas shows several Kickapoo camps across north Central and East Texas. A splinter group was camped on a league of land granted to Jesse Denison on Spring Creek in 1831. Denison never occupied his league and the Kickapoos coexisted peacefully with the settlers until moving on. The village was on the south bank on Spring Creek at Kickapoo Creek. This area on Spring Creek was surveyed and settled in the 1830?s without mention of the Kickapoos by surveyor or settler. One may assume that they moved in the 1820?s. Kickapoo tribes did fight with settlers in West Texas. The Kickapoo School was on the SW corner of Kickapoo Rd. and Waller - Spring Rd. The school was built about 1897 and was consolidated with Waller in 1931. The school building was moved to Waller and used as a home. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=155958298 155958298 Monaville School Monaville was named for the daughter of the first postmaster and never listed as a Texas town. Monaville was a crossroads community center for both black and whites. With the F. S. Styers Cotton Gin, and later the Shindler Gin, Lupe?s store on FM-359, the Monaville School on FM-1887 and Hayes Tavern on the northwest corner of FM-1887 and Holik Road - Monaville could have become a town. A railroad would have assured it. The Monaville School District included three schools: Monaville, Aurora, and Sunnyside. The Monaville School had 11 grades in 1934. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=155959514 155959514 Waller High School 1941 http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=191329215 191329215 Mt. Zion School (Brookshire) The school opened in the 1890?s and served the Mt. Zion Community near Leslie Station in Brookshire or Pattison. Leslie Station was the railroad depot and there was a Leslie Cotton Gin in 1893. This school was not the Mt. Zion Church or school at Sunnyside. Sunnyside Another Mt. Zion School opened in the 1870?s on Mt. Zion Road at Sunnyside. This was on 5/7 acre just west of Irons Creek in S. William?s Grant, purchased in 1890 from T. W. House et al. as part of a tract known as the Weston Place. (Robert A. Weston) And was replaced by the Bob Burton school. These two schools were on Mt. Zion Road, the older was about 50 yards west of Hall Road on the north side of Mt. Zion. The newer in 1925 was called Bob Burton School since he donated the land on the south side of Mt. Zion. The new school was between the Sunnyside cemetery and Lewis Lane. Rosenwald built the Bob Burton school. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=155959671 155959671 Pine Island School Groves of trees in the vast and flat coastal prairies were called ?islands.? Pine Island was once a large community or a small town located south of Prairie View on Brumlow Road at Pine Island Road. A church and a historical marker remain. The first school reported for Pine Island opened on the west side of FM-350 in 1888. In 1899, the first school at Pine Island was located on the north side of Brumlow Road across from the intersection with Betka Road. In 1900, J. E. Mills deeded one acre on the south side of Brumlow at Pine Island Road to the Pine Island Baptist Church. L. C. Taylor deeded 5 acres adjoining the church to School District # 18 in 1919 and a new two-room school was built next to the church. The old one-room building is shown attached to a larger two-story building in the undated photo. The wooden one-room building was replaced in 1919 by a two-room frame building, which became the last school in the Pine Island District as they consolidated into Waller in 1928. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=155960588 155960588 Pine Island School 1919 The new ?two-room? schoolhouse built in 1919 next to the Pine Island Baptist Church. The building was really one large room divided by accordion doors, which were opened for school plays or community events. Classes were for grades one through eight. The high school students attended Hempstead. This was the last school in the Pine Island District as they consolidated into Waller in 1928. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=155960763 155960763 Waller School 1887-1898 http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=191329218 191329218 Waller School The first school in the Waller Community was private and taught by Miss Nettie Collins. She began with only two students, but other parents employed her to teach their children. In 1887, a school district was organized according to the provisions of the state school law. The first school building was a 30? by 24? frame located at the site of the present J. C. Jenkins home. The first term was for six months and the teacher received a salary of $ 35 per month. Waller was a community of seven houses, one was the section house. The community and the school grew very slowly - so slow that for several years, only one teacher was required. The slow growth continued for three decades, then in the late twenties, education became a high priority. In 1929, the Waller School Board members outlined their plan for a six-teacher school to provide for increased enrollment by the consolidation of the Pine Island District with Waller. The six-teacher school is shown.. Miss Ogg taught school in Waller County. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=156088289 156088289 Waller School 1899-1917 http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=191329219 191329219 Bessie Creek School Shown in picture are Mrs. John Neiman and Becky Glueck. http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=181980376 181980376 Waller School 1917 to late 1950's http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=191329220 191329220 Royal High School Commons Area http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=181980380 181980380 Royal High School Hallway http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=181980381 181980381 Royal High School Library http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=181980382 181980382 Waller Elementary Building 1960 http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=191519334 191519334 Waller Junior High School 1960 http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=191519335 191519335 Waller Main School Building 1960 http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=191519636 191519636 Pattison Area School, Early 1900's Buddy Glick pictured, Donated by Billy Knight http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=200429345 200429345 Royal Schools 1967-68 http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=203927434 203927434 Royal High School Auditorium 1967 Currently the Junior High (2010) http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=203927435 203927435 Pattison School 1923 http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=203961979 203961979 Browns Prairie View School http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=204026085 204026085 Brookshire School 1925 http://www.wallercountyhistory.org/apps/photos/photo?photoID=204069676 204069676